Vote early. Check your ballot status at vote.wa.gov
Vote early. Check your ballot status at vote.wa.gov

Ballots have been mailed out and voting has started in Washington state! Key dates to keep in mind:


Check your ballot status. vote.wa.gov. Image: Magnifying glass with a partially magnified eye
Check your ballot status. vote.wa.gov. Image: Magnifying glass with a partially magnified eye

We’ve gotten a lot of reports that Facebook is taking down links to a site with county-by-county lists of ballots that have signature mismatches. The Secretary of State describes this site as “unverified voting information” and “misinformation”, and so it looks like Facebook is removing posts that mention it.

Still, it’s a very good reminder that 1–2% of ballots in Washington state have missing or mismatched signatures. The good news is that you can almost always “cure” your ballot if there’s a problem — usually just by filing a form.

You can check your ballot status yourself, using the statewide portal at VoteWA.gov — or your county’s election site. We’ve got detailed instructions here.

So please check your ballot’s status— and please encourage your friends and family to do the same!


Check your ballot status. vote.wa.gov. Image: the Indivisible Plus Washington Logo
Check your ballot status. vote.wa.gov. Image: the Indivisible Plus Washington Logo

Almost 50% of Washington voters have already returned their ballots — and there’s still a week to go until the 8 p.m. deadline on November 3! But there’s one more step to take after you vote: checking to see that your ballot has been received and accepted.

You can check your ballot’s status on VoteWA.gov (the statewide voting portal) or your county’s election site. Here’s how to do it on vote.wa.gov.

Start by filling in your first name, last name, and date of birth. Then click the Submit button. [If the system doesn’t find you, double-check your information. Your name and middle initial need to be exactly as it appears on your driver’s license, state ID card, or voter registration; and your birthdate needs to be in month/day/year format. …


Update, October 26: the ballot box is back open again

The ballot drop box at the Mill Creek post office will be unavailable until early next week after being hit by a truck. Eric Stevitz has details in the Everett Herald:

The Mill Creek ballot drop box is temporarily closed after the Friday incident, said Garth Fell, the Snohomish County Auditor whose office oversees elections. It also was was hit in September.

The box was struck by a truck, which dislodged it from its footings and bent the metal. All ballots remained safely inside the box and were not compromised, Fell said. …


Do you have your ballot? No? Go to vote.wa.gov to check your registration status and get a replacement.
Do you have your ballot? No? Go to vote.wa.gov to check your registration status and get a replacement.

If you haven’t received your ballot — or you got it, but lost it or spilled something on it — you can get a replacement two ways:

  1. pick it up in person at your county’s election office or a voting center. Many counties offer curbside service. You may need to make an appointment in advance.
  2. print it out, using VoteWA.gov or your county’s election site

The Secretary of State has contact information and links to the websites for all the county election offices. If you run into problems, call your county election office.

Here’s the instructions on how to print out a replacement ballot using VoteWA.gov. …


Register to vote, in big blue block letters at an angle
Register to vote, in big blue block letters at an angle

People who are houseless have the right to vote, but face practical obstacles when trying to do so. Understanding these obstacles is key to securing voting rights for the houseless here in Washington.

Residency and Mailing Address Requirements.

Washingtonians must provide both their residential and mailing address on their voter registration form. For the houseless, these two addresses are likely to be different. For a houseless person, their residence might be a street corner, park, shelter or other identifiable location where the person typically stays at night.

A houseless person’s mailing address may be any place where the person can pick up their mail. It can be a shelter, friend or relative’s house or other location willing to accept mail for that person. Or it can be a post office box or even general delivery at a local post office. A person’s mailing address need not be in the same precinct as the person’s residential address. …


What should we do when we see disinformation? How to combat digital voter suppression techniques like false voting information or propaganda discouraging people from voting?

Thanks to Shireen Mitchell of Stop Online Violence Against Women for the fast-paced training session on responding to disinfo and digital voter suppression. Here’s the video.

The slides are available at https://digitalsista-disinfo-slides. And the video’s also available on Facebook.

Here’s some of the highlights.

Don’t amplify disinfo! Think before you engage or share. Avoid sharing headlines that include the disinfo. Be careful!
Don’t amplify disinfo! Think before you engage or share. Avoid sharing headlines that include the disinfo. Be careful!

Here’s the video from last Thursday’s Positively R-90 event, featuring speakers from the Approve R-90 campaign and Indivisibles discussing how we can support this critical referendum on age-appropriate, inclusive K-12 comprehensive sexual health education. The slides are available here.

Here’s five ways you can help pass R-90:

Thanks to Joseph Lachman, Lillian Lanier, Annie Forsman-Adams, Larry Behrendt, and Katherine Cleland for the excellent presentations — and thanks to Washington Indivisible Network for co-hosting!

Vote to approve R-90 — keep our youth safe and healthy, and a picture of three happy people.
Vote to approve R-90 — keep our youth safe and healthy, and a picture of three happy people.

6 people of different races and genders with arms around each other, and the text Approve 90: Safe & Healthy Youth Washington
6 people of different races and genders with arms around each other, and the text Approve 90: Safe & Healthy Youth Washington

A yes vote on Referendum 90 will uphold the new Washington state law requiring all public schools to teach age-appropriate, inclusive, comprehensive sexual health education (CSHE) to K-12 students. R-90 will support safe and healthy youth in Washington state.

Indivisible Plus Washington supports R-90 for multiple reasons:

  • Approximately 60% of school districts already comply with the CSHE state law. Standardizing CHSE throughout Washington state school districts will result in greater equity across the region. LGBTQ+ children will be represented in curricula across the state and no longer be marginalized at the discretion of individual school districts. Six curricula are currently approved, and R-90 also allows school districts to develop their own CSHE curriculum, so long as it is medically and scientifically accurate, and consistent with the provisions outlined in the bill. …

Many thanks to Shireen Mitchell for leading a great discussion of disinformation and digital voter suppression! Thanks as well to everybody who joined us and contributed to the excellent discussion, and to Washington Indivisible Network for co-sponsoring.

Here’s the video

The slides are available here. There’s also a lot more information about disinfo and digital voter suppression in Shireen’s earlier Fighting Back webinar, and the backgrounder we put together.

Some next steps:

About

Indivisible Plus Washington

Indivisible Plus Washington is a state-wide organization focused on voter engagement and turn out, fighting disinformation, and combatting systemic oppression

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